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Book Bears and Cubs

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(no subject) [Dec. 20th, 2006|10:11 am]
Book Bears and Cubs

kyan_of_gilead
Well, that last post was supposed to include, "specifically, Dragonlance". :P
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(no subject) [Dec. 20th, 2006|10:11 am]
Book Bears and Cubs

kyan_of_gilead
Hello! I was wondering if anyne reads sci-fi/fantasy
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(no subject) [Nov. 30th, 2006|09:57 am]
Book Bears and Cubs

starzcub
HAS anyone read Michael Crichton's new book????
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School Reading [Nov. 16th, 2006|12:47 am]
Book Bears and Cubs

starzcub
... Coming of Age in Mississippi by Anne Moody. I recommend it to everyone.
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Reading... [Aug. 14th, 2006|11:55 pm]
Book Bears and Cubs

starzcub
[Current Location |home]
[Current Mood |sillysilly]
[Current Music |Hanging by a String]

Hey Bears,

I am a reader... when I have time away from classes.... This summer I read John Morgan Wilson's "Rhapsody in Blood." He is a gay-writer with a gay "bearish" protaganist.

Currently I am trudging through "Mirror, Mirror" by Gregory Maguire.
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Nostalgia [Jun. 21st, 2006|07:55 pm]
Book Bears and Cubs

tim_e_bear
[Current Mood |nostalgicnostalgic]
[Current Music |The Book I Read by Talking Heads]

Was at the bookstore today, and I bought what, as far as I can remember, was the first novel*% I read. By Marion Estes, called THE WITCH FAMILY. It would have been about 1971 or 1972 that I read it.

*it MAY have been another book called THE FOG PEOPLE, whose author I can't recall. It was ONE of those two.

%now, first book with a story to it was probably a CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG book.
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Blink [Apr. 8th, 2006|09:35 pm]
Book Bears and Cubs
bearmafia



This book is about the first impressions and why we have a "hunch" about something. The book got to a good start but soon got to a point where I felt like there is only so many ways to tell the same story. Now it's sort of the like "I get it"....but still quite interesting especially the priming bits. Some of the stuff was really boring and quite obvious but certainly entertaining enough to keep one awake on a trans-atlantic flight...at least for few hours...
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Sue Grafton [Apr. 3rd, 2006|04:04 pm]
Book Bears and Cubs

toddmichael
thought I'd post a little something to the community - this is my first post!

I just finished reading Sue Grafton's S is for Silence. Are there any mystery readers amongst the members?

Tonite I started reading Tight by Patrick Sanchez. His books are hilarious!

A few posts back someone recommended Freakonomics - I have that on my bookshelf too! Hope to get to that soon.
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Already Dead [Mar. 14th, 2006|01:42 am]
Book Bears and Cubs

geminigeekcub
[Current Mood |geeky]
[Current Music |the hum of the computer]

I have been wandering into Borders and reading a chapter a day from Already Dead. I liked the gritty tone and noir feel to it. I didn't like that it didn't even try to make the story plausible, there was some loose referances to locations in NYC but mostly just street numbers.
I finally finished it today, I usually go in read a couple of chapters of a book and if i'm hooked buy it and take it home but I was hooked enough to keep going back but wasn't hooked enough to pay for a large paperback.
I would like to read more from this auther using this character but I won't buy the book when it comes out in small paper back.
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Recent Readings [Mar. 6th, 2006|11:06 pm]
Book Bears and Cubs

durabear
[Current Music |Tracy Byrd - Ten Rounds With Jose Cuervo]

Just finished reading Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores The Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner.



I was expecting a rather dry scientific read, but instead found it to be easy, entertaining and enlightening.

The book ranges through questions as disparate as

"Do sumo wrestlers cheat?";
"If drug dealers make so much money, why do they live at home with their mothers?";
"Does spending more money on your political campaign really make a difference?";
"Which is more dangerous, a gun or a swimming pool?"; and
"Do the unusual names that some black parents give their children hurt their later career prospects?"

These questions may seem to have nothing in common; but in fact they are all questions that few people ask, and that--with the right data--can be answered with sometimes startling results. What sets Levitt apart as an economist is that he finds the right data and interprets it in ways that few others do, debunking popular beliefs where necessary.

There are numerous themes throughout the book, but they seem to revolve around the nature of conventional--and often incorrect--wisdom, the impact of incentives on individuals and groups, and the nature of information, how it is used by "experts" to get the better of the non-experts.

I read it in two sittings, and honestly couldn't put it down. Of course, there has been a negative impact in that I'm now questioning every statistic I hear. But in today's political/social environment, that's probably a good thing....
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